Insights and Interviews from #FIGT18 – Out Now!

 

Insights and Interviews from the 2018 Families in Global Transition Conference: 

Diverse Voices Celebrating the Past, Present and Future of Globally Mobile Lives

When a conference is as great as FIGT you want to remember all that you learned and were inspired by during the Keynotes, the Concurrents, the fast-paced Lightning Sessions and at the Kitchen Tables. It’s impossible to attend every session and for many it is impossible to attend every conference. This book, compiled by the Parfitt Pascoe Writing Residency team, will bring the event back to life complete with its experts, its insights and conversations. You know that this, the fifth book in the series, deserves a place on your bookshelf.

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The Expat Bookshop’s 2018 Top Ten

It’s that time of year again when Expat Nest, Counselling Without Borders, asks us here at the Expat Bookshop to list our favourite titles written by or for expats published during the year. Expat life remains a hot topic for writers – the books just keep coming. In no particular order, here is our top 10 for 2018 – books to inform, inspire and admire, books to make you laugh and make you cry – in words and pictures.

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Jane Barron Reviews Misunderstood

Misunderstood comprehensively explores the impact international life can have on children growing up overseas in the 21st century. It is written for two main audiences: traditional Third Culture Kids (TCKs) – “children of expatriates, growing up in families that live as foreigners abroad,” and those who care for them – parents, educators, youth workers, extracurricular coaches and even therapists.

Author Tanya Crossman grew up as both a domestic and international TCK before embarking on a decade-long journey of discovery as a youth worker alongside TCKs in China. In this book, she brings her own experiences together with the global voices of more than 700 TCKs, and many of their parents, to “advocate for TCKs: to explain their worldview and share their stories – in their words.”

Beginning with the basics, Tanya builds readers’ understanding of the three categories of influence for children growing up overseas, the difference between 20th century and 21st century TCKs and the challenges of living abroad. She then meticulously walks the reader through the many different experiences of TCK life, including the reason they are overseas in the first place, the variety of educational options available, the range of family types represented – both traditional and non-traditional – and the different relationships they may have with their host country or countries. The following chapters deal extensively with transition and grief, goodbyes and hellos and the inner lives of TCKs before focusing on the future. Any TCK reading this book will find themselves in these pages because Tanya describes “a perspective, not a person.”

What sets this book apart from others in the global transition genre is the way Tanya brings research, perspective and solutions together. She identifies the challenge, fear or feeling “many TCKs believe others cannot, or will not, understand,” then underpins it with research and wisdom from experts in the field and articulates it using anecdotes from TCKs and Adult Third Culture Kids (ATCKs). For each challenge, Tanya provides solutions and strategies for parents/ caregivers to support their TCK, so those challenges do not become traumatic but instead serve as springboards for growth.

The title of the book, Misunderstood, may lead readers to assume the contents are negative in nature but in fact it is very balanced. This word, misunderstood, was repeated over and over in interviews and conversations Tanya had with TCKs yet the book provides an insight into the heads, hearts and souls of children growing up overseas to dispel any misunderstanding. It bridges the gap between TCKs feeling misunderstood and adults trying to understand. TCKs reading this book will identify with the words ‘spoken’ by other TCKs and perhaps find a vocabulary to express their emotions and find a sense of belonging. Parents, educators and other caregivers will gain the understanding TCKs desperately need and want in order to encourage, equip and support them to “develop into emotionally mature adults,” either abroad or at home. Misunderstood is a book of hope and one I would highly recommend for all TCKs and those who care for them.

About the Book

Jane Barron, Youth Intercultural Transition Specialist, Globally Grounded